Consortium Introduction

The Consortium conducts original research, serves students and faculty, and advances public dialogue and understanding on emerging issues at the intersection of science and society.

Latest News

Book cover -- Deadliest Enemy

New Book by Consortium Scholar Offers Strategies for Emerging Diseases

March 22, 2017

Renowned epidemiologist Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, director of Consortium member the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), has published a new book laying out how humanity can protect itself against catastrophic infectious disease and pandemic. In Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs, Prof. Osterholm applies knowledge and strategies acquired during his fights againt bioterrorism, pandemic influenza, Ebola and other public health emergencies. His goal? To describe "the latest medical science, case studies, policy research, and hard-earned epidemiological lessons. . . we need to develop if we are to keep ourselves safe from infectious disease." You can view a lecture delivered yesterday by Prof. Osterholm on the subject of the book here. He will be moderating a lecture on a closely related topic, Combating Microbial Terrorists, by former head of the Centers for Disease Control Julie Gerberding, MD, MPH, on April 13; register to attend or view the webcast here

Toy soldiers in salad

Registration Open for Annual Food Defense Conference

March 10, 2017

A safe food supply is a cornerstone of a secure society. The annual Food Defense Conference, sponsored by Consortium member center the Food Protection and Defense Institute, brings together experts from around the world to share strategies for the prevention, protection, mitigation, response, and recovery of the food system from intentional acts and adulteration, including those resulting from terrorism and criminal activities. The 2-day event is being held held on May 3-4, 2017 on the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus, and provides a unique and intimate opportunity for scholars, policymakers, regulators, and members of the food industry to network and learn from each other about the current state of food defense. Learn more and register here

Logo for Petrie Flom Center, Harvard Law School

Patient-led Medicine Symposium on Harvard Bill of Health Blog

March 6, 2017

A symposium published today on Bill of Health, a blog edited by the Petrie-Flom Center at Harvard Law School, expands on discussions held at the Consortium's Deinard Memorial Lecture last December, "How Patients Are Creating Medicine’s Future." The Deinard lecture featured four speakers – Ernesto Ramirez of Fitabase, Jason Bobe of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Barbara Evans of the University of Houston Law Center, and Kingshuk K. Sinha of the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. The Bill of Health symposium provides commentary on their lectures and further reflections on the ways citizen science and wearables are transforming both health care and medical research. A video of the entire Deinard lecture can be viewed here

IMAGE.brain

Brain Scientists Push Back on "Technology Fetish"

February 28, 2017

A new study described by The Atlantic as "part philosophical treatise and part shot across the bow," argues that neuroscientists have been led astray by new research technologies. The authors point to the need for "a more pluralistic notion of neuroscience when it comes to the brain-behavior relationship: behavioral work provides understanding, whereas neural interventions test causality." Lead author John Krakauer notes, "People think technology + big data + machine learning = science. And it’s not." One example is mirror neurons, "the most hyped concept in neuroscience," in which "interpretation is being mistaken for result." Read the study, published in Neuron, here

Upcoming Events

Consortium Updates

Frontiers in Research Ethics

On March 8-9, the Consortium hosted two conferences on informed consent, featuring nationally-known speakers. The first of them, The Future of Informed Consent in Research and Translational Medicine, focused on how informed consent ethics and policy have developed over the past century, and what tools are needed to improve patient and research participant protections going forward. The second, The Challenges of Informed Consent in Research with Children, Adolescents and Adultsanalyzed approaches to seeking consent from adults with diminished capacity; community-based participatory research; and pediatric assent and guardian permission. The latter conference kicked off the first-ever Research Ethics Day at the University of Minnesota, and concluded with trainings and workshops the afternoon of March 9. Videos of the conferences will be posted on this website within the next two weeks. 

Research Funding

Each year, the Consortium provides funding for intramural projects related to the societal implications of problems in health, environment, and the life sciences. This year’s proposal deadline was Feb, 13, 2017; awards will be announced by March 31. Learn more and review previous awards.