The International Climate Change Negotiations: The Road from Copenhagen

Prof. Daniel M. Bodansky, JD

Arizona State University 

Wednesday, November 17, 2010 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm

Mississippi Room, Coffman Memorial Union 

 View Video  Duration: 1 hour 32 minutes

Prof. Bodansky discussed the outcomes of the 2009 Copenhagen climate change conference. Was it a success or failure? He also foreshadowed the Cancun Climate Change conference, which took place in Nov. 2010, asking whether any agreements that came out of Cancun were likely to do better than Copenhagen. Specifically, was the Cancun conference likely to produce a new legal agreement on climate change, either to supplement or replace the Kyoto Protocol? In his talk, Prof. Bodansky discussed the past, present, and future of international climate change negotiations.

Commentators: 

CONSORTLV bodansky 2010  karkkainen JPG
Brad Karkkainen, JD, Professor, Law School
University of Minnesota

CONSORTLV bodansky 2010 klink JPG
Katherine Klink, PhD, Professor, Department of Geography
University of Minnesota

CONSORTLV bodansky 2010 osofsky JPG
Hari Osofsky, JD, Associate Professor, Law School
University of Minnesota

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Continuing legal education credit (CLE) for attorneys (1.5 hours) was approved. 

Prof. Daniel Bodansky

Daniel Bodansky, JD, is the Lincoln Professor of Law, Ethics, and Sustainability in the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University. He has also has been named an affiliated faculty member in both the College of Law's Center for Law and Global Affairs and the Global Institute of Sustainability at ASU. His scholarship includes two books, 24 scholarly articles and book chapters, five book reviews and more than 40 papers and presentations.

Prof. Bodansky is the recipient of a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellowship, a Pew Faculty Fellowship in International Affairs, and a Jean Monnet Fellowship from the European University Institute in Florence. Bodansky currently serves on the board of editors of the American Journal of International Law and is the U.S.-nominated arbitrator under the Antarctic Environment Protocol. In addition, he is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the American Society of International Law.