Financial Conflicts of Interest in Biomedical Research

David Korn, MD

Association of American Medical Colleges

Wednesday, March 10, 2004 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm

Theater, Coffman Memorial Union

View Video Online    Duration: 90 min


Dramatic advances in biomedical research have been accompanied by an equally dramatic deepening of financial relationships between medical faculty and their institutions with industry sponsors and patrons, and this trend will only intensify in coming years. Research universities and their academic medical centers are increasingly exhorted by political leaders to serve as engines of local and regional socio-economic improvement. Yet the public continues to expect that academic research, and especially clinical research, will be free from any taint of financial conflict of interest. In the face of this serious conflict of public expectation, how best can we protect the welfare of human research participants, investigators, and universities, as well as the integrity of science, while continuing vigorously to facilitate the translation of publicly funded biomedical research discoveries into public benefit?

Commentators: 

 FACULTY.bowie_norman
Prof. Norman Bowie, PhD
Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota

FACULTY.hamilton_david
Prof. David Hamilton, PhD
Interim Vice President for Research, University of Minnesota

David Korn, MD

David Korn, MD, is the Senior Vice President for Biomedical and Health Sciences Research at the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) in Washington, DC. He previously served as Carl and Elizabeth Naumann Professor and Dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine and as Vice President of Stanford University. He was a founder of the California Transplant Donor Network and more recently, a founder of the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs, a nonprofit member corporation created to enhance and make more uniform the protection of human participants in medical research. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and a founder of the Clinical Research Roundtable. His recent research and writing focuses on issues of health and science policy, topics in which he has been heavily engaged on the national scene.