Race & ethnicity

News

Black mother holding a young baby on her shoulder

Racial Disparities in Infant Mortality Examined

February 16, 2017

An article in The Nation, "What’s Killing America’s Black Infants?" provides a sobering analysis of the disproportionately high death rate among African-American babies. Despite decades of interventions and public health initiatives, the racial infant mortality gap actually grew during the 1980s and 90s: during that time, "Black women who received prenatal care starting in the first trimester were still losing children at higher rates than white women who never saw a doctor during their pregnancies." This led to research into whether black women have a genetic predisposition to poor birth outcomes, which was largely disproven. However, more recently, "a growing body of evidence points to racial discrimination, rather than race itself, as the dominant factor in explaining why so many black babies are dying." The article profiles efforts in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which has one of the worst infant-mortality rates of all US cities, to reverse the trend.

News

Nurse taking man's hearbeat with stethoscope

Health Disparities Training and Funding Opportunities

October 28, 2016

Prof. Kola Okuyemi, MD, MPH, has been awarded a $1.5M grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to educate researchers about reducing cancer-related health disparities among underserved populations. Prof. Okuyemi, Director of the Program in Health Disparities Research, says these trainings are designed to "prepare predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees with the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct cancer-related health disparities intervention research." In related news, the Center for Healthy African American Men through Partnerships (CHAAMPS), a joint program of the University of Minnesota and the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), has announced two funding opportunities: Pilot Projects (4-6 grants available to faculty from Minnesota, UAB, Johns Hopkins University, MD Anderson Cancer Center and UC Davis) and the Scholars Disparities Program (2-4 grants available to grad students, post-docs, medical residents, medical fellows and faculty at the same institutions). To learn more about deadlines, etc., click on the links above or contact Laurel Nightingale, MPH, MPP, CHAAMPS Collaborations Coordinator, at nigh0021@umn.edu.

News

Sean Sherman, American Indian chef

Focus on American Indian Food and Nutrition

August 18, 2016

A group of chefs and scholars that has been working for decades to restore Native American food traditions is experiencing new momentum. One of them is Sean Sherman, who draws from the indigenous cuisine of Midwestern tribes like the Lakota and Ojibwe, precolonial food cultures that were supported by sophisticated trade routes and intra-tribal cultural exchanges. Mr. Sherman plans to expand his catering business, Sioux Chef, to include a restaurant in Minneapolis that will not only feature Native American foods and bring jobs to the local community, but also serve as a driver for American Indian-owned food businesses like those he uses to supply walleye and wild rice. Want to learn more? On Sept. 26-27, the First Annual Conference on Native American Nutrition will be held in Prior Lake, Minnesota. The event is cosponsored by Consortium member center Healthy Foods, Healthy Lives and the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, and will bring together tribal officials, researchers, practitioners, and others to discuss the current state of knowledge about Native nutrition and food science. Register here.

News

Arrest disparities in the Twin Cities map

U Professors Shine a Spotlight on Racial Disparities

July 21, 2016

In the wake of another fatal police shooting of an African-American man, Philando Castile, who was killed during a traffic stop in a Twin Cities suburb, there's been an increased focus on racial inequities in Minnesota. One of the scholars with the longest history of studying these issues, Myron Orfield, JD, is on the faculty of the University of Minnesota's Law School; since Castile's death, Orfield has been widely interviewed discussing housing segregation, unequal policy enforcement, and other aspects of the state's institutionalized racism. Minnesota suffers from a yawning academic achievement gap between white students and students of color; the worst record of financial inequity in the nation; and a serious problem with socioeconomic and health disparities. A recent lecture hosted by the Consortium, by Prof. Sidney Watson, JD (University of St. Louis Law School) describes tools in the Affordable Care Act to increase health justice; that talk can be viewed online

News

Cesar DeLeon

Force Feeding of Inmate Can Go Forward, Judge Rules

July 15, 2016

A request by Cesar DeLeon to discontinue force feeding has been denied by Circuit Court Judge Steven Bauer. DeLeon is one of several Wisconsin prisoners who began a hunger strike in early June to protest long-term solitary confinement, which in the case of one of the strikers has lasted more than 25 years. In his suit, DeLeon cited free-speech and religious grounds and accused a prison guard of withholding water during the force feeding procedure, which is necessary to avoid food and liquids being aspirated. Prof. Steven Miles, MD, of Consortium member the Center for Bioethics was interviewed for an article by the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism. Miles notes that "force feeding of prisoners is condemned by most major medical groups, including the American Medical Association and the International Committee of the Red Cross. The World Medical Association has declared that 'the forced feeding of hunger strikers is unethical and is never justified,' calling the practice 'inhuman and degrading.'” Miles asserts that "prisoners’ refusal to eat should not be viewed in medical terms alone, saying 'A hunger strike is fundamentally a form of political expression by persons or groups which have exhausted other forms of political expression.'" 

News

White Tuskegee researcher drawing blood from Black man

Legacy of Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment Revelations: Reduced Life Expectancy for Black Men

June 14, 2016

Since it was revealed in 1972, the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male has been considered among the most egregious violations of research ethics during the 20th century. The study began in 1932; for 40 years, researchers passively monitored hundreds of adult black males with syphilis, despite the availability of effective treatment. The study was funded by the US Public Health Service (PHS), and only concluded when PHS employees alerted journalists, having been ignored or rebuffed by their employer. A newly published paper outlines the tragic legacy: "the historical disclosure of the study in 1972 is correlated with increases in medical mistrust and mortality and decreases in both outpatient and inpatient physician interactions for older black men." The authors of the study estimate "life expectancy at age 45 for black men fell by up to 1.4 years in response to the disclosure, accounting for approximately 35% of the 1980 life expectancy gap between black and white men." At last December's Consortium-sponsored Research with Human Participants conference, Prof. Vanessa Northington Gamble, MD, PhD (George Washington University) discussed her work as Chair of the federal committee that obtained an official apology for the study from President Bill Clinton in 1997 -- view her talk here

News

Biospecimens in lab

Controversy Erupts on Informed Consent for Biospecimens

May 16, 2016

A new proposal by the Obama administration would require scientists who work with human biospecimens to obtain consent from patients prior to using them in research, even when all personal information is removed. The proposed change is part of the revision of the Common Rule, the federal law used to govern research with human participants, which is currently under review. In effect, the new policy would broaden the definition of "human subject" to include tissues, blood, and urine. Some scientists, medical device manufacturers, and advocacy groups are concerned about the chilling effect this could have on research, including the Precision Medicine Initiative. Bioethicists have raised issues about plans to offer new forms of consent, with Consortium collaborator Ellen Wright Clayton, MD, JD, of Vanderbilt University questioning whether those could be effective: “The idea that this informed consent will be in any way meaningful I think is illusory.” Read an article about the debate from STAT here

News

Graphic on elements of CBPR

Course on Community-based Participatory Research Announced

April 15, 2016

Starting Sept. 12, a course in Community-based Participatory Research (CBPR) will be offered to graduate students and community practitioners who want to know more about this powerful approach to understanding and addressing health and social disparities. Each Monday from 4-6, the class will explore the purpose and applications of CBPR; partnership formation and maintenance; issues of power, race, class, and social justice; conflict resolution; ethical issues; and CBPR's relationship to cultural and community knowledge systems. Please note this course can either be taken for academic credit (tuition costs apply) or for free by community practitioners seeking a certificate. 

News

brooke cunningham

Racial Gaps and Health Disparities in the News

April 11, 2016

University of Minnesota faculty members have been making headlines for their work addressing connections between race and health care disparities. An article in STAT profiles Prof. Brooke Cunningham, MD, PhD (Medical School), a physician and sociologist who recently taught first-year medical students about the dangers of misunderstanding the concept of race. In her lecture, Prof. Cunningham pointed out that race is not a fixed, scientific category, cautioning these future doctors to think critically about using racial characteristics in diagnosing and treating patients. Her lecture was part of a course taught by Prof. David Satin, MD (Medical School), whose recent scholarship on why black patients are sometimes undertreated for pain was profiled on PBS NewshourProf. Dorothy E. Roberts, JD (University of Pennsylvania) was also interviewed during the segment; her 2010 Deinard Memorial Lecture on Law & Medicine, "What's Wrong with Race-Based Medicine," can be viewed here.  

Lecture

Lecture

Alexander Khoruts

The Evolving Human Microbiome

Prof. Alexander Khoruts, MD
February 17, 2016 -
11:30am to 1:00pm

Best Buy Theater, 4th floor, Northrop Auditorium

Research

JLME Fall 2006

Colliding Categories: Haplotypes, Race & Ethnicity

This project explored the impending collision between biological and regulatory classifications of population subgroups in American society. Researchers focused on the interaction between biological categories emerging from the effort to create a haplotype map of the human genome and preexisting categories specifying race and ethnicity embodied in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget's Directive 15, which governs collection of data by all federal agencies and in federally funded research.

Conference

Lecture