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Nanowarming in an alternating magnetic field

U Researchers Develop New Nanotech to Improve Transplant Outcomes

August 23, 2017

A team led by University of Minnesota researchers has developed a new method for thawing frozen tissue that may enable long-term storage and subsequent viability of tissues and organs for transplantation. The method, called nanowarming, prevents tissue damage during the rapid thawing process that would precede a transplant. The U of MN has long been a leader in organ transplants – 2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the world's first pancreatic transplant, in 1967. According to the study's co-author, Prof. Michael Garwood, PhD, of the University of Minnesota Dept. of Radiology, "Prior to the development of [this nanowarming technology, called] SWIFT, no imaging technique had been capable of quantifying high concentrations of iron-oxide #nanoparticles in tissues non-invasively." Consortium Chair Susan M. Wolf led the team that developed the oversight guidelines for nanotechnology research with human participants; learn more about those here.

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Nanobot in bloodstream

Chemistry Nobel Prize Goes to Nanotech Scientists

October 5, 2016

Three scientists have been awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work on designing tiny machines "a thousand times thinner than a strand of hair," according to the BBCJean-Pierre Sauvage (Strasbourg University), Fraser Stoddart (Northwestern University) and Bernard Feringa (University of Groningen) will share the prize, which is worth approximately $930,000. Nanotechnology – "the creation of structures on the scale of a nanometer, or a billionth of a meter," as described in the New York Times – could be used to precisely deliver pharmaceuticals within the human body and may lead to entirely new therapeutic approaches. Consortium Chair Susan M. Wolf has led significant efforts, funded by the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, to determine the best way to protect human beings who participate in nanotechnology research. Two major symposia evaluated oversight models using a historical and comparative approach and produced the first systematic, comprehensive recommendations on how to protect human participants in nanotech research. To see all the Consortium's work on nanotechnology, click here

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Prof. Efie Kokkoli

Efie Kokkoli Honored by AIMBE

May 12, 2016

Professor Efie Kokkoli, PhD, has been inducted into the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) College of Fellows, a top honor in her field of Chemical Engineering. Prof. Kokkoli was recognized for outstanding contributions to the design of peptide- and aptamer-amphiphiles for the development of functionalized biomaterials. The AIMBE College of Fellows represents 1,500 individuals, the top 2 percent of the most accomplished and distinguished medical and biological engineers responsible for innovation and discovery, consisting of clinicians, industry professionals, academics and scientists. Prof. Kokkoli has collaborated on two major nanotechnology research projects involving the Consortium, DNA Nanotechnology: Developing and Analyzing a New Tool for Sensing and Targeting Disease and NIRT: Evaluating Oversight Models for Active Nanostructures and Nanosystems: Learning from Past Technologies in a Societal Context.

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Fatehi L , Wolf SM , McCullough J , Hall R , Lawrenz F , Kahn JP , Jones C , Campbell SA , Dresser RS , Erdman AG , Haynes CL , Hoerr RA , Hogle LF , Keane MA , Khushf G , King NMP , Kokkoli E , Marchant G , Maynard AD , Philbert M , Ramachandran G , Siegel RA , Wickline S . Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 2012;40(4):716-50 . PDF icon Download PDF (4.37 MB)

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