Nanotech

News

Nanobot in bloodstream

Chemistry Nobel Prize Goes to Nanotech Scientists

October 5, 2016

Three scientists have been awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work on designing tiny machines "a thousand times thinner than a strand of hair," according to the BBCJean-Pierre Sauvage (Strasbourg University), Fraser Stoddart (Northwestern University) and Bernard Feringa (University of Groningen) will share the prize, which is worth approximately $930,000. Nanotechnology – "the creation of structures on the scale of a nanometer, or a billionth of a meter," as described in the New York Times – could be used to precisely deliver pharmaceuticals within the human body and may lead to entirely new therapeutic approaches. Consortium Chair Susan M. Wolf has led significant efforts, funded by the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, to determine the best way to protect human beings who participate in nanotechnology research. Two major symposia evaluated oversight models using a historical and comparative approach and produced the first systematic, comprehensive recommendations on how to protect human participants in nanotech research. To see all the Consortium's work on nanotechnology, click here

News

Prof. Efie Kokkoli

Efie Kokkoli Honored by AIMBE

May 12, 2016

Professor Efie Kokkoli, PhD, has been inducted into the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) College of Fellows, a top honor in her field of Chemical Engineering. Prof. Kokkoli was recognized for outstanding contributions to the design of peptide- and aptamer-amphiphiles for the development of functionalized biomaterials. The AIMBE College of Fellows represents 1,500 individuals, the top 2 percent of the most accomplished and distinguished medical and biological engineers responsible for innovation and discovery, consisting of clinicians, industry professionals, academics and scientists. Prof. Kokkoli has collaborated on two major nanotechnology research projects involving the Consortium, DNA Nanotechnology: Developing and Analyzing a New Tool for Sensing and Targeting Disease and NIRT: Evaluating Oversight Models for Active Nanostructures and Nanosystems: Learning from Past Technologies in a Societal Context.

Publication

Publication

Fatehi L , Wolf SM , McCullough J , Hall R , Lawrenz F , Kahn JP , Jones C , Campbell SA , Dresser RS , Erdman AG , Haynes CL , Hoerr RA , Hogle LF , Keane MA , Khushf G , King NMP , Kokkoli E , Marchant G , Maynard AD , Philbert M , Ramachandran G , Siegel RA , Wickline S . Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 2012;40(4):716-50 . Download PDF (4.37 MB)

Publication

Publication

Symposia

Symposia

Symposia

News

Liquid Nitrogen in beaker

Nanotechnology Could Transform Organ Transplant Availability

June 8, 2015

Could nanoengineering save the lives of the thousands of people die each year while waiting for organ transplants? That's the hope of John Bischof, a professor of mechnical engineering at the University of Minnesota. Prof. Bischof is among the research scientists profiled in a Wired article about preservation methods that could enable organ banking. Josh Morrison, director of an organ donation group, notes the importance of research to addressing this intractable problem: "Pursuing living donation strategies (or other strategies to increase organ donation today) should not come at the expense of scientific investment for the future.”

News

Nano particles

Oversight in Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research

April 21, 2015

Prof. Susan M. Wolf, JD, chair of the Consortium, was a plenary speaker at the 2015 Global Conference on Nanoengineering for Medicine and Biology. The event, held in Minneapolis beginning April 19, is sponsored by the American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME). In her talk, Wolf discussed the challenges of evaluating and regulating potential risks and hazards of nanotechnology, and shared the results of an NIH-funded consensus project she led on oversight for human subjects research in nanomedicine. Publications related to the grant are available here

Research

Nano net

DNA Nanotechnology: Developing and Analyzing a New Tool for Sensing and Targeting Disease

This 2-year project used breakthrough DNA nanotechnology to engineer and evaluate materials to address major health challenges and food system issues. We propose to use aptamer-amphiphiles as DNA nanotubes to target and treat Alzheimer’s disease and brain tumors, and as sensors to detect food allergens such as milk. DNA nanotubes have the potential to deliver compounds – such as nucleic acids – to the brain safely and efficiently, while aptamer-amphiphiles can detect milk with potentially ultrafast response time.

Research

Journal of Nanotechnology Research

NIRT: Evaluating Oversight Models for Active Nanostructures and Nanosystems: Learning from Past Technologies in a Societal Context

This project aimed to identify oversight models for nanotechnology by assessing 6 historical oversight models: for drugs, devices, gene transfer, genetically engineered organisms in the food supply, chemicals in the workplace, and chemicals in the environment. The project brought together a multidisciplinary group of Investigators and senior personnel from the University of Minnesota, with strengths in nanotechnology research and development, public policy, law, health, environment, economics, and bioethics and involves outside collaborators representing a range of perspectives.

Research

Cover of Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 2012

Nanodiagnostics and Nanotherapeutics: Building Research Ethics and Oversight

This project produced the first systematic and comprehensive recommendations on how to protect human participants in research on nanodiagnostics and nanotherapeutics, including drugs, devices, and gene therapy using nano-vectors. Research in nano-medicine is burgeoning, with research on human participants under way, but current research ethics and oversight have not yet adequately addressed key concerns including uncertainty about how to assess risks.

Conference

Conference

Conference