Genomics & genetics

News

National Football League logo

The Ethics of Football: NFL Player Health Policies Examined

February 1, 2017

Just in time for next Sunday's Superbowl game, a new paper published in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review explores the legal and ethical aspects of a hypothetical National Football League (NFL) player's health. The authors, who include Consortium collaborator I. Glenn Cohen of Harvard Law School, ask "What are the current legal standards for employers collecting and acting on an individual’s health- and performance-related information?" They draw upon disability law, privacy law and other disciplines to provide recommendations to better protect the health and privacy of professional football players. The authors find that "it appears that some of the existing evaluations of players, both at the NFL Scouting Combine (Combine) and once drafted and playing for a club, seem to violate existing federal employment discrimination laws." To correct this, they recommend both adherence to current laws and changes to existing statutory schemes. Read the entire article here

News

Turkey

Poultry DNA Sequencer a Powerful Tool in Antibiotic Resistance Research

December 21, 2016

A state-of-the-art genetic analysis tool has been deployed to Willmar, Minnesota, the heart of the state's burgeoning turkey business. According to an article in Agweek, beginning in 2017 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is implementing new restrictions that change how livestock producers use antibiotics in feed to promote growth. The action is being taken to address growing concerns that antibiotic resistance could threaten public health. Veterinary science professor Tim Johnson is leading the project, which is housed at the U's Mid-Central Research and Outreach Center. According to Johnson, the DNA sequencer "will improve the speed and the resolution of our ability to detect pathogens of the bad bacteria and the bad viruses" by helping researchers understand how pathogens travel and examining "emerging diseases of poultry and other animals to be able to quickly identify what's causing problems." The Consortium is hosting a three-part series on a related topic, Emerging Diseases in a Changing Environment, starting on Jan. 24; learn more and register here

Publication

O'Daniel JM, McLaughlin HM, Amendola LM, Bale SJ, Berg JS, Bick D, Bowling KM, Chao EC, Chung WK, Conlin LK, Cooper GM, Das S, Deignan JL, Dorschner MO, Evans JP, Ghazani AA, Goddard KA, Gornick M, Farwell Hagman KD, Hambuch T, Hegde M, Hindorff LA, Holm IA, Jarvik GP, Knight Johnson A, Mighion L, Morra M, Plon SE, Punj S, Richards CS, Santani A, Shirts BH, Spinner NB, Tang S, Weck KE, Wolf SM, Yang Y, Rehm HL. A Survey of Current Practices for Genomic Sequencing Test Interpretation and Reporting Processes in US Laboratories. Genetics in Medicine 2016;18(11). Download PDF (638.01 KB)

News

Pamala Jacobson, Professor of Pharmacy

Pamala Jacobson Named Distinguished Pharmacy Professor

October 17, 2016

Consortium collaborator Pamala Jacobson, PharmD, FCCP, has been named a Distinguished Professor under the Pharmacy Scholars program. Prof. Jacobson's appointment grants her the "Distinguished Professor" title and $10,000 a year salary augmentation for a five-year period. The principal criteria for the award are the duration and significance of the person's contributions to the development of his/her discipline, and the impact of the person's scholarly endeavors on a national and international level. Prof. Jacobson is a renowned clinician, scientist, and national leader in clinical pharmacology. In her pharmacogenomics research program, she studies how to effectively use genetic and other biomarkers to improve drug efficacy and reduce toxicity. She has been a leader in the emerging field of precision medicine, serving as director of the University's Institute of Personalized Medicine and as one of four Principal Investigators of the Minnesota Precision Medicine Collaborative (MPMC), along with Consortium Chair Susan M. Wolf, JD; Ellen Demerath, PhD; and Kingshuk Sinha, PhD. You can view video of her commentary on Rex Chisholm's 2015 lecture, "Integrating Electronic Health Records and Genomics for Discovery and Implementation: The eMERGE Experience," which was sponsored by the Consortium, here

Research

News

Red and blue abstract people figures with magnifying glass

Consortium Chair, 3 Colleagues Awarded Grand Challenges Research Grant

September 29, 2016

Consortium Chair Susan Wolf and three Co-Investigators – Profs. Pamala JacobsonKingshuk Sinha, and Ellen Demerath – on behalf of the Working Group on Advancing Health Through Tailored Solutions, have been awarded a Grand Challenges grant from the Office of the Provost to establish the Minnesota Precision Medicine Collaborative (MPMC). This 2-year, $500,000 grant will fund creation of a transformative University-wide initiative to use 21st century technologies – including genomics, informatics, bioengineering, analysis of environmental exposures, and behavioral sciences – to tailor health care to the challenges facing individuals and their communities. This precision medicine approach will fundamentally alter our understanding of health, disease prevention, and treatment. Core to this project is partnering with citizens, patients, and healthcare providers to understand and effectively address major health problems. MPMC will create a living laboratory, starting with demonstration projects on Alzheimer’s disease, lung cancer, and depression. All three are diseases whose incidence, burden, and mortality rates reveal disturbing health disparities. This focus will enable us to leverage U of M research strengths across many disciplines and to engage with partners in the health industry and Minnesota’s underserved communities. By investing in the development and delivery of precision medicine, our university will contribute to the national effort to transform science, medicine, and public health through more precise understanding of the factors contributing to health and disease. MPMC aims to make a unique contribution through collaborative research, cutting-edge innovation, responsible policy, and sustained commitment to improving health equitably across our communities.    

News

Prof. Suma Jacob

DNA-based Autism Research May Support Early Interventions

September 28, 2016

A growing amount of evidence points to the importance of early behavioral interventions in the treatment of autism. However, health professionals typically won't diagnose the disorder sooner than 18 months, and often much later. To help close this gap, a major, national research study is being led in Minnesota by Prof. Suma Jacob, MD, PhD, of Consortium member the Center for Neurobehavioral Development. The study, SPARK, has the goal of collecting DNA and other data from 50,000 people with autism and their family members. An article in MinnPost quotes Prof. Jacob as saying "There have been studies that have shown that there are strong heritable components in autism. . . . What’s exciting about [SPARK] is we know that we need to gather a large number of families with autism to find as many potential connections as possible. We are in the process of collecting that large sample." She cautions, however, "The disorder is different in each individual. . . . Generalizations just don’t fit."

News

Cancer Moonshot logo

Cancer Moonshot Announces Next Steps for Transformative Research

September 8, 2016

In his 2016 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama announced the Cancer Moonshot, an intensive research collaborative to accelerate immunotherapy as an effective treatment for cancer patients. Led by Vice President Joe Biden, doctors, patients, researchers, pharmaceutical companies, insurance companies, and technologists are striving to managing cancer as a chronic condition, like diabetes, rather than a devastating and life-threatening illness. Last June, Consortium member center Masonic Cancer Center hosted a local event that was part of the national launch of the Moonshot, which featured remarks by VP Biden and US Senators Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken. Yesterday, a Blue Ribbon Panel released its roadmap for the effort, recommending 10 transformative research approaches for achieving major strides in cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment by 2020. The report can be read here.

News

Model of crystal structure for CRISPR-Cas9

There's More Than One Way to Edit a Gene

August 15, 2016

The gene-editing technique known as CRISPR has generated immense excitement for enabling scientists to alter genomes "with unprecedented precision, efficiency and flexibility," in hopes of accelerating cures for genetic diseases. However, while CRISPR has been receiving the lion's share of attention in the media, a new article in Scientific American outlines its limitations: as researchers have used CRISPR, particularly the Cas9 tool, they've been reminded "how fragile every new technology is," according to George Church of the Harvard Medical School. The article describes several alternatives that researchers hope will offer more precise pathways for rewriting DNA, which plant scientist Daniel Voytas of the University of Minnesota notes is essential to the advancement of the field: “Everyone says the future is editing many genes at a time, and I think: ‘We can’t even do one now with reasonable efficiency.'" Each month seems to bring new advances in the field: read the article, which provides an up-to-date overview of what's happening, here

News

LawSeq logo stacked

LawSeq to Clarify Consent, Standards, Liability in Genomic Medicine

July 6, 2016

An article in GenomeWeb provides a comprehensive overview of the LawSeqSM project, a 3-year, $2 million grant recently awarded to Consortium chair Susan M. Wolf, JD, and two co-PIs, Ellen Wright Clayton, MD, JD (Vanderbilt) and Frances Lawrenz, PhD (University of Minnesota). The methodology will be a "combined approach involving empirical work, analytic research, and negotiation to reach consensus" within the national working group; the effort will also be informed by prior research in the field of genomic medicine by both Wolf and Clayton. The resulting guidelines will inform case law, fill gaps in current regulations and shape those developed in the future. Another important outcome will be "a public-facing website that simply describes in detail the current state of the law in relation to genomics and genome sequencing." 

Research

LawSeq logo corrected Dec 2016

LawSeq: Building a Sound Legal Foundation for Translating Genomics into Clinical Application

This innovative 3-year project, based cooperatively at the University of Minnesota and Vanderbilt University, has convened a national Working Group of top legal and scientific experts to analyze current federal and state law and regulation on translational genomics and to generate consensus guidance on what the law should be. The project team will build a searchable online database of relevant law and an annotated bibliography for free public access, systematically collect and analyze a range of stakeholder inputs, convene a national public conference, and publish analyses and recommendations to help shape the law to support genomic medicine.

News

LawSeq logo stacked

Consortium Awarded $2M NIH Grant to Co-lead Genomic Law Recommendations

June 7, 2016

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has just awarded the first-ever grant dedicated to laying the policy groundwork needed to translate genomic medicine into clinical application. The project – LawSeqSM– will convene legal, ethics and scientific experts from across the country to analyze what the state of genomic law is and create much-needed guidance on what it should be. The principal investigators leading the grant are Consortium Chair Susan M. Wolf, JD; Ellen Wright Clayton, MD, JD (Vanderbilt University); and Frances Lawrenz, PhD (University of Minnesota). They will be joined by a group of 22 top experts – from academia, industry, and clinical care – who will collaborate over the course of this 3-year project to clarify current law, address gaps, and generate the forward-looking recommendations needed to create the legal foundation for successfully translating genomics into clinical care. Learn more about the project here

News

Medicine capsules

Personalized Prescriptions Hampered by Insurance Gaps, Doctor Confusion

May 24, 2016

Despite the promise of pharmacogenomics – selecting drugs based on a patient's genetic makeup – significant obstacles to its wide implementation remain. According to an article in Scientific American, "fewer than 10 hospitals around the country. . . are offering pharmacogenomic tests," citing two primary impediments to wider use: inadequate insurance reimbursement and the fact that "doctors are not accustomed to making medication choices using genetics." This matters because each year, "half of all medical patients get a drug that could interact with their genes and cause serious side effects." To build understanding and acceptance of the practice, a research group led by Mary Relling, PharmD, of St. Jude Research Hospital in Memphis, has received funding from the National Institutes of Health to document any new drug-gene relations solidified with new research. Pharmacogenomics is the topic of this year's University of Minnesota Precision Medicine Conference on June 20, featuring nationally-known experts in the field; learn more and register here.  

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DNA helix plus family genomic map

Genomic Research Privacy Recommendations in the News

May 18, 2016

An article in the Huffington Post by Robert C. Green, MD, MPH (Harvard, Brigham and Women's Hospital) outlines the conclusions reached by a team of researchers led by Consortium chair Susan M. Wolf, JD; Gloria Petersen, PhD (Mayo) and Barbara Koenig, PhD, RN (UCSF). Their charge: to make recommendations regarding the disclosure of genomic incidental findings to family members of research participants. The national working group for the project included Green and other eminent scholars. Thus far, the study has produced consensus recommendations; a published symposium; and a public conference

News

Prof. Efie Kokkoli

Efie Kokkoli Honored by AIMBE

May 12, 2016

Professor Efie Kokkoli, PhD, has been inducted into the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) College of Fellows, a top honor in her field of Chemical Engineering. Prof. Kokkoli was recognized for outstanding contributions to the design of peptide- and aptamer-amphiphiles for the development of functionalized biomaterials. The AIMBE College of Fellows represents 1,500 individuals, the top 2 percent of the most accomplished and distinguished medical and biological engineers responsible for innovation and discovery, consisting of clinicians, industry professionals, academics and scientists. Prof. Kokkoli has collaborated on two major nanotechnology research projects involving the Consortium, DNA Nanotechnology: Developing and Analyzing a New Tool for Sensing and Targeting Disease and NIRT: Evaluating Oversight Models for Active Nanostructures and Nanosystems: Learning from Past Technologies in a Societal Context.

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Prof. Wolf Lectures on Genomics and Public Health

May 11, 2016

Consortium Chair Susan M. Wolf, JD, lectured yesterday at Boston University's School of Public Health. Her topic was the current status of legal and ethical guidelines, as well as the development of best practices, related to translational genomics – issues given greater urgency in light of the federal Precision Medicine Initiative, which launched last year. For more than a decade, Prof. Wolf has led groundbreaking research on return of results (RoR) from genomic testing to research participants, patients, and their families. In her talk at Boston University, she delved into the public health implications of RoR and identified areas needing further study, including the blurring of boundaries between research and clinical applications of genomic scans; difficulties with properly interpreting gene variants; and the need to augment unrepresentative or inadequate data sets to insure they represent well vs. unwell populations and reflect gender and ethnic diversity. Video of the lecture and the following Q&A can be viewed here.  

News

brooke cunningham

Racial Gaps and Health Disparities in the News

April 11, 2016

University of Minnesota faculty members have been making headlines for their work addressing connections between race and health care disparities. An article in STAT profiles Prof. Brooke Cunningham, MD, PhD (Medical School), a physician and sociologist who recently taught first-year medical students about the dangers of misunderstanding the concept of race. In her lecture, Prof. Cunningham pointed out that race is not a fixed, scientific category, cautioning these future doctors to think critically about using racial characteristics in diagnosing and treating patients. Her lecture was part of a course taught by Prof. David Satin, MD (Medical School), whose recent scholarship on why black patients are sometimes undertreated for pain was profiled on PBS NewshourProf. Dorothy E. Roberts, JD (University of Pennsylvania) was also interviewed during the segment; her 2010 Deinard Memorial Lecture on Law & Medicine, "What's Wrong with Race-Based Medicine," can be viewed here.