Genomics & Genetics

Consortium Faculty

Publication

Publication

Publication

Publication

Publication

Research

Image of DNA strand

Return of Genomic Results and Estimating Penetrance in Population-Based Cohorts

This study will develop and implement a genomic return of result (gRoR) process in the Framingham Heart Study and Jackson Heart Study cohorts and explore associated medical, behavioral and economic outcomes. The study will also explore ways to automate and streamline genomic variant interpretation at scale, and pursue novel analysis techniques for aggregating data to aid assessment of penetrance. The discoveries generated will provide guidance for gRoR for large-scale population studies and biobanks, including underrepresented minority participants.

Publication

News

Health Law Professors Logo

Profs. Wolf and Clayton Moderate Panel at 2019 Health Law Professors Conference in Chicago: LawSeq: Building a Legal Foundation for Genomics & Precision Medicine

July 8, 2019

Professor Susan M. Wolf, JD (University of Minnesota) and Professor Ellen Wright Clayton, JD, MD (Vanderbilt University), recently moderated a panel discussion on “LawSeq: Building a Legal Foundation for Genomics & Precision Medicine” at the 2019 Health Law Professors Conference, sponsored by the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics and Loyola University Chicago School of Law. Panelists included Professor Barbara J. Evans, LLM, JD, PhD (University of Houston), Professor Gary Marchant, JD, MPP, PhD (Arizona State University), and Professor Mark Rothstein, JD (University of Louisville). Based cooperatively at the University of Minnesota and Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the LawSeqSM project has convened a national working group of top legal and scientific experts to compile, collect, and analyze current US federal and state law and regulation on translational genomics. Read More

News

Dome of US Capitol Building

Gene Patent Policy Under Review by Congress

June 6, 2019

A new article in Wired by Megan Molteni describes potentially momentous changes in the legal status of gene patents. According to Molteni, "In 2013, the Supreme Court unanimously struck down patents on two human genes – BRCA1 and BRCA2 – associated with breast and ovarian cancers. Justice Clarence Thomas wrote for the court at the time that isolated DNA 'is a product of nature and not patent eligible.' The historic decision invalidated patents held by Myriad Genetics" and opened the way for companies like 23andMe to offer direct-to-consumer tests of BRCA and other genes. A new bill making its way through Congress would make "changes to several sections of the statutes covering patent law and [add] a provision that would nullify the Supreme Court’s exceptions." The congressional debate is driven by concerns that overly stringent patent rules are hindering US companies from creating potentially lucrative new diagnostic tools, allowing rivals like China to outpace American innovation. Hearings are currently underway to clarify the intention of the bill and ensure it effectively addresses industry concerns. Read the entire Wired article here, and one on the same topic from GenomeWeb here. For more information about genomics law and policy, visit the NIH-funded LawSeqSM website, created by the Consortium in collaboration with Vanderbilt University. 

News

LawSeq logo stacked

LawSeq Conference Videos Now Available

May 29, 2019

Videos of all sessions of the LawSeqSM conference are now available. This event brought together an eminent group of scientists, researchers, attorneys and clinicians on the campus of the University of Minnesota to grapple with gaps and areas of confusion in genomic law. The symposium was part of the LawSeqSM project, an NIH-funded effort to shape the future of law and policy to encourage the translation of genomic medicine ​from lab to clinic. View the conference videos here. A related resource is the LawSeqSM genomic law website, which includes a searchable database of relevant state and federal law as well as articles and commentaries to provide context. 

Publication

News

International Germline Editing Commission Launched

May 22, 2019

The US National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine and the Royal Society of the UK have announced the formation of an expert group to develop a framework to guide scientists, clinicians and regulators in their use of human germline genome editing. According to the release, "The commission is the latest action from the international science community to address issues around human genome editing. It follows [last November's] Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing in Hong Kong," where scientist He Jiankui shocked attendees by revealing the birth of twins whose genomes had been edited. Germline editing is of particular concern because genetic changes will be passed down to future generations, greatly expanding the potential for disastrous, unanticipated outcomes. “'These revelations at the summit in Hong Kong underscore the urgent need for an internationally accepted framework to help . . . address the complex scientific and medical issues surrounding clinical use of germline genome editing,' said NAM President Victor J. Dzau and Royal Society Vice-President John Skehel, co-chairs of the commission’s international oversight board, in a joint statement." The law and policy related to clinical uses of genomic medicine are among the topics addressed in the LawSeqSM project, co-led by Consortium Chair Susan M. Wolf. Learn more about relevant, existing regulations here