'Sensory Santa' for Kids with Autism Will Help Find Participants for SPARK Study

Santa Claus with 2 kids on his lap
Thursday, December 13, 2018

The Center for Neurobehavioral Development, a Consortium member, is using an unusual partner — Santa Claus — to raise awareness of SPARK, the largest autism genetics study in the nation. According to a story from Minnesota Public Radio (MPR), the Center is hosting a Sensory Friendly Santa event this coming Saturday, Dec. 15, from noon-4. Dr. Suma Jacob, who helped organize the event, notes, "It varies for different individuals but one way to describe [sensory sensitivity] is that some people can hear almost every noise around them and have a difficult time blocking it out. . . . Our Santa has worked with kids with autism and other developmental disabilities. Santa will be mindful to wait for the child to approach instead of taking the lead." Dr. Jacobs leads the University of Minnesota SPARK team, and explains that one goal of the event is to let families know about the study and how they can participate. According to MPR, "As part of the study, children will be able to give saliva samples instead of having their blood drawn, which can often be especially traumatic for children with sensory sensitivities."