International Germline Editing Commission Launched

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

The US National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine and the Royal Society of the UK have announced the formation of an expert group to develop a framework to guide scientists, clinicians and regulators in their use of human germline genome editing. According to the release, "The commission is the latest action from the international science community to address issues around human genome editing. It follows [last November's] Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing in Hong Kong," where scientist He Jiankui shocked attendees by revealing the birth of twins whose genomes had been edited. Germline editing is of particular concern because genetic changes will be passed down to future generations, greatly expanding the potential for disastrous, unanticipated outcomes. “'These revelations at the summit in Hong Kong underscore the urgent need for an internationally accepted framework to help . . . address the complex scientific and medical issues surrounding clinical use of germline genome editing,' said NAM President Victor J. Dzau and Royal Society Vice-President John Skehel, co-chairs of the commission’s international oversight board, in a joint statement." The law and policy related to clinical uses of genomic medicine are among the topics addressed in the LawSeqSM project, co-led by Consortium Chair Susan M. Wolf. Learn more about relevant, existing regulations here