Innovative Minnesota Law Challenges Coal-fired Power

Pollution from factory
Tuesday, April 19, 2016

An administrative judge has determined that the costs of climate change, which Minnesota is required to account for when deciding how to generate electricity, have previously been assessed much too cheaply. In her ruling, Judge LauraSue Schlatter mostly agreed with the US government's calculation of the social cost of carbon emissions, ruling that the federal figures are more realistic than those Minnesota had been using. This means the state is likely to face a ten-fold increase in its calculation of climate change costs, which will probably make wind and solar energy significantly cheaper than burning coal. Kevin Lee, the attorney who represented a group of physicians in the case, noted they are "thrilled. . . . It's a huge victory for the environment and for public health in Minnesota." The law requiring the state to account for social costs of pollution was passed in the 1990s, and is unique in the nation. To learn more, listen to the entire Minnesota Public Radio story here