Groundbreaking Case Hinges on Family Genetic Privacy, Access

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Monday, November 26, 2018

Doctors at a London hospital are being sued "because they failed to tell [a woman] about her father’s fatal hereditary disease before she had her own child," according to the Guardian. "The woman discovered – after giving birth – that her father carried the gene for Huntington’s disease, a degenerative, incurable brain condition. Later she found out she had inherited the gene and that her own daughter, now eight, has a 50% chance of having it. The woman. . .  says she would have had an abortion had she known about her father’s condition, and is suing the doctors who failed to tell her about the risks she and her child faced. It is the first case in English law to deal with a relative’s claim over issues of genetic responsibility." Much of the groundwork for US legal and policy approaches to these complicated issues can be found in a symposium, "Should We Offer Genomic Research Results to a Participant's Family, Including After the Participant's Death?" edited by Consortium Chair Susan M. Wolf, Barbara A. Koenig (UCSF) and Gloria M. Petersen (Mayo Clinic). The symposium grew out of an NIH-funded grant, "Disclosing Genomic Incidental Findings in a Cancer Biobank: An ELSI Experiment," for which Wolf, Koenig and Petersen served as Principal Investigators.