DNA Testing Being Used to Reunite Families Separated at Border

DNA strands
Monday, July 9, 2018

According to an article in Scientific American, "Several DNA testing companies have volunteered their services to help reunite immigrant families separated at the southern U.S. border. But scientists and ethicists warn broad-based genetic tests are 'overkill' and do not make sense for making such matches." Consortium chair Susan M. Wolf is among them; she raises concerns about whether permission to undergo genetic testing in such circumstances is really given freely, one of the core requirements for obtaining informed consent — the article notes, "a parent faced with not getting their child back if they do not get a genetic test really has no option." Wolf goes on to point out problems with defining "family" solely by biological relationship: “What about the loving long-time caregiver who may not be genetically related to that child? Those families deserve reunification, too.” Despite such concerns, The Atlantic reports that the US Department of Health and Human Services announced last week that it will conduct DNA tests in an attempt to comply with a court order from the US District Court in San Diego. The court declared that all minors from separated families need to be reunited with their parents or guardians by July 26.