Chemistry Nobel Prize Goes to Nanotech Scientists

Nanobot in bloodstream
Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Three scientists have been awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work on designing tiny machines "a thousand times thinner than a strand of hair," according to the BBC. Jean-Pierre Sauvage (Strasbourg University), Fraser Stoddart (Northwestern University) and Bernard Feringa (University of Groningen) will share the prize, which is worth approximately $930,000. Nanotechnology – "the creation of structures on the scale of a nanometer, or a billionth of a meter," as described in the New York Times – could be used to precisely deliver pharmaceuticals within the human body and may lead to entirely new therapeutic approaches. Consortium Chair Susan M. Wolf has led significant efforts, funded by the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, to determine the best way to protect human beings who participate in nanotechnology research. Two major symposia evaluated oversight models using a historical and comparative approach and produced the first systematic, comprehensive recommendations on how to protect human participants in nanotech research. To see all the Consortium's work on nanotechnology, click here